Remedial Building Project Management

Life cycle costing analysis for design and construction of new infrastructure.

Remedial Building Project Management

BCRC can assist owners as well as designers and contractors identify the most economical design option considering whole life cost analyses. From a structural design point of view, the major costs pertain to the initial costs related to design and construction and the future costs are mainly related to maintenance and repair of the structures over its service life. Energy and operating costs such as heating, and cooling could be significant components in the overall life cycle cost for a structure, but they generally do not depend on the structural design parameters concerning strength, reliability and serviceability.

Hence in a structural design development based on whole life cycle cost analysis, the primary objective would be to achieve an optimum balance between the initial costs of structural design and construction and the future/recurrent costs of repair and maintenance with respect to the various design parameters. The extent and timing of these future costs are dependent on the service life of the structure which, in turn, depends on the exposure environment and the level of structural performance expected to be maintained. Hence this design approach involves an integration of service life and the ensuing durability considerations into the structural design process.

We were recently involved in the design of a major coastal defence marine facility in WA, where we helped the design team identify the most economical design option for the main wharf using life cycle cost analyses (LCCA) between the compliant conventional construction materials and methods, and an alternative innovative solution. This LCCA comprised an economic assessment of the divergent elements of the two competing design options, considering selected costs of ownership over the economic life of each divergent alternative. Thus, the life-cycle cost would be the total discounted dollar cost of owning, maintaining, and disposing of the divergent structural elements over a period of 100 years. Hence, the LCCA focussed mainly on the following costs which the owner would incur on the divergent elements of the structure during its lifetime, to keep the structure operational.

  • cost of construction
  • structural inspection and maintenance costs
  • structural rehabilitation and protection costs

Remedial Building Project Management

In addition to the construction and maintenance costs, the analysis could also incorporate the long-term environmental, socioeconomic and sustainability impacts of the two options to select the most economical and durable option.

BCRC’s approach to whole life cycle costing analysis usually comprises the following activities:

  • Review proposed systems to support 100-year design life of the structure – for compliant design as well as the proposed alternative design options.
  • Provide feedback to design team on possible improvements in alternative design.
  • Review and compile inputs into labour and material rates provided by the Client and other suppliers, sub-contractors.
  • Develop durability and maintenance strategies to ensure both options would result in a 100-year low maintenance structure, based on the specified minimum performance requirements.
  • Evaluate the level of effort required for the inspection, maintenance and rehabilitation of the structure over the design life.
  • Populate the life cycle cost report with key assumptions in maintenance intervals and performance of materials/ systems, over the life of the structure.
  • Develop the LCC model and analyse the life cycle costs of both options.
  • Provide a report outlining the effectiveness of the proposed alternative system, highlighting advantages in maintenance, and compare the lifecycle costs of the options.

Based on the study, the alternative option was observed to be the most economical not only in terms of the cost of construction but also the life cycle cost of maintenance and repairs. The Client used this report in their tender submission in support of their proposed steel module alternative.

Life cycle costing analysis for optimising structural repairs.

All structures deteriorate with age and, sometimes, prematurely due to aggressive exposure conditions that were not addressed in design and construction. Sooner or later, this results in damage to the structure and, hence, in a reduced service life. When a structure reaches such a level of deterioration that an intervention and repair decision must be made, it is necessary to first understand the cause of deterioration by carrying out a condition assessment of the structure and then analyse and select the most appropriate repair method, keeping the desired service life and the whole life cycle cost of the repair in mind.

BCRC can assist clients, repair engineers and repair contractors with their decision making based on economical as well as technical aspects. Based on our wide experience with all types of structures in various exposure conditions, we are able to identify the root cause of deterioration and the best technical solutions that could be applied for remediation. Thereafter, a comparison of different adequate and durable repair methods is done by means of life-cycle costs. To ensure that the existing budgetary resources are best used to preserve the optimal structural condition, the costs and future effects of repair methods are taken into account. Repair strategies are examined for their economical relevance, and this permits a comparison of different repair strategies, thereby optimizing the available financial resources.

Calculations or estimations of costs can be carried out in different ways by considering various types of costs. Lifecycle costs may be used as a valuable tool for the assessment of the cost effectiveness of various technical solutions for condition assessment, maintenance and repair strategies during operation of the structure.

As a basis for the life cycle costs of a concrete structure up to the end of desired service life, the net present value formula is used. Initial repair costs are generated from repair design, planning, surveying, through to implementation and final inspection. Follow-up costs refer to costs for future inspections, maintenance and rehabilitation. The functional unit of the life cycle costs is $ per m2 of repaired concrete surface. From the LCC analysis, it often turns out that repair methods with low initial costs at the end of the theoretical service life turn out to have higher life cycle costs.

In addition to the construction and maintenance costs, the analysis could also incorporate the long-term environmental, socioeconomic and sustainability impacts of the two options to select the most economical and durable option.

BCRC’s approach to whole life cycle costing analysis usually comprises the following activities:

  • Review available repair systems to support the desired service life of the structure.
  • Provide feedback to repair team on possible improvements in alternative design.
  • Review and compile inputs into labour and repair material rates provided by the Client and other suppliers, sub-contractors.
  • Develop durability and maintenance strategies to ensure the selected repair options would result in the desired service life with the expected level of maintenance and performance.
  • Evaluate the level of effort required for the future inspection, maintenance and rehabilitation of the structure over the design life.
  • Populate the life cycle cost report with key assumptions in maintenance intervals and performance of repair materials/ systems, over the life of the structure.
  • Develop the LCC model and analyse the life cycle costs of repair options.
  • Provide a report outlining the effectiveness of the proposed repair system, highlighting advantages in maintenance, and compare the lifecycle costs of the available options.

Remedial Building Project Management

BCRC can provide remedial project management services across the following market sectors: Building & Strata, Commercial buildings, and Infrastructure.
Once the requirements for repair have been determined and the repair is designed owners or strata managers will need to arrange for the remediation of the building. BCRC are well versed in the management of remedial works and remedial consulting. We can offer full remedial project management services including;

  1. Preparation of tender documents
  2. Calling for tenders
  3. Evaluation of tender submissions
  4. Award of contract
  5. Contract management
  6. Defects liability management

BCRC’s expertise in this field stems from the company directors’ extensive research and experience in the remedial sector (see BCRC director’s CVs). Their careers have seen their involvement in remedial works ranging from single dwellings to 50 storey towers; from road projects to port infrastructure. Follow the above links for an explanation of each aspect of the remedial project management process.

If you have any questions regarding remedial project management or our services in this field, contact us today.

Preparation of tender documents

The tender documents are the legal means by which a client indicates their requirements to those parties who are bidding to carry out the work. In most cases, contractors will bid for a project based on the tender documents. Given the uniqueness of remedial projects and the specific limitations they present, such as live-in occupants and serviceable structures, the tender documents must not only encapsulate the work required but must also set out the correct method for carrying out that work.

To secure the best value remediation for our clients, BCRC can prepare detailed, high-quality request for tender (RFT) documents at the right stage of the project. These can include

  • A scope of works
  • A detailed repair specification
  • Technical drawings
  • Scope for potential variations
  • Details on the tender query and response process

Remedial Building Project Management

A carefully crafted scope of works and a detailed repair specification that includes technical drawings is the key to a successful remediation project. High-quality documents can not only reduce overall project costs and ensure on-time project completion (by accounting for all required activities so that they can be costed and planned for) but will also ensure an optimal and durable repair solution. To ensure a detailed repair specification is developed, BCRC conduct in-depth investigations into the cause of the deterioration before recommending a repair solution. Check out our Building and Construction Inspection and Concrete Testing services for details.

Contract variations in remedial work are not uncommon. Due to investigations (upon which the tender scope of work is based) typically being limited in nature (it is not feasible or cost effective to conduct full investigations), as work unfolds the actual scope of repairs can differ from the scope assumed at tender stage. By including a scope for potential variations, contractor’s bids on these items can be compared in conjunction with the known scope of work and the possible commercial impact of variations can be accounted for in the tender evaluation.

Remedial Building Project Management

Call for tenders

Tender documents can then be distributed to the industry at large through dedicated tender notification services, or provided directly to a select group of known, trusted remedial contractors.

Evaluation of offers

We can then evaluate tenders received to ensure our client not only obtains an optimal price but also receives an appropriate quality of workmanship – i.e. to ensure our client obtains the best value on offer and recommend which offer our client should accept . If none of the submitted tenders are acceptable, BCRC will recommend that none are accepted and the market should be further tested.

It is during the evaluation of offers that the necessity of preparing adequate tender documents becomes integral. By ensuring that all construction processes are itemised down to quantifiable elements that can be given a dedicated time frame and cost, each tender can be compared most effectively by quantitative means. It is also by this process that an overall project cost and duration can be considered.

Tenders will be assessed in terms of the following;

  • Detail of sequence itemisation and pricing (will also provide an indication of the potential quality of work)
  • Overall cost
  • Company’s reputation within the industry in conjunction with previous work completed either under BCRC’s management (if applicable) or in general.

By assessing the above items, BCRC will be able to ensure the best price and quality of work will be completed for a client in the most appropriate timeframe.

Remedial Building Project Management

Remedial Building Project Management

Award of contract

BCRC can then facilitate the award of contracts to successful tenderers and review contract terms to ensure they are acceptable and comprehensive prior to signing by our client. See the below section for further detail.

Contract management

Contract management begins with contract development. BCRC’s Marton Marosszeky defines and provides solutions to the problems presented during contract development and management in a recent co-authored paper. BCRC can leverage our wealth of industry experience to represent our client’s needs when negotiating contract terms with the selected contractor.

During the remedial works, we can act as project Superintendent and provide the following ongoing advice to our client

  • Monitor quality
  • Review variations
  • Monitor progress
  • Review contractor progress claims
  • Provide repair phase consultancy services (respond to contractor RFI’s, etc.)
  • Certify the works
Defects liability management

We provide representation during work contracts the form of a client project coordinator and quality inspection service. These ensure that the scoped remedial works are executed in accordance with the specification and quality standards. Our experience in managing contract risk ensures that our clients obtain reliable outcomes in terms of expenditure and the quality of the remedial works.